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Thread: Pitch Counts in IHSA

  1. #31
    Plus Member Fritzgerald's Avatar
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    Here is an interesting rule change for collegiate pitchers.

    Prospect League Announces Pitching Guidelines
    May 26, 2016 3:49 AM EDT

    Chillicothe, OH–The Prospect League, a summer collegiate wood bat organization, announced new pitching guidelines for all twelve franchises. The Prospect League’s continued efforts to innovate and provide a framework for reducing the possible overuse of game day pitching will take effect immediately.

    The Prospect League’s Baseball Committee recently completed these guidelines to include many facets of game day pitching rules and regulations. These new guidelines include both starting and relief pitchers.

    “These new guidelines are based on a six man rotation and have been implemented to help reduce overuse of our players,” said Commissioner Bryan Wickline. “All League franchises are committed to protecting these players and create an atmosphere and culture to help them reach their ultimate baseball goals.”

    Examples of these guidelines will limit a Starting Pitcher to no more than ninety pitches. An exception to this guideline would be if that starting pitcher has a “No-Hitter”. In this case, the pitcher may remain in the game until a hit is produced. However, once that pitcher has reached 115 pitches they must be replaced from the game.

    Additionally, any pitcher throwing forty plus pitches in one inning must be removed from the game.

    Bullpen sessions between starts will limit starting pitchers to the following: (after a 2-3 day rest that pitcher may throw 25-35 pitches; on back to back bullpen sessions the pitch limit is 15-20 pitches).

    Relief pitchers will be limited to four innings and/or a sixty pitch count over a two day span.

    If a reliever pitches two innings in a game and throws 30 pitches; the next day he can pitch in a game 2 innings and 30 pitches. So back to back days would require 2 days off if he threw two innings each day.

    If a pitcher accumulates 40 pitches in one game that pitcher is a required the next day off. If a pitcher throws 55 pitches in one game that pitcher will be required to take 2 days off unless he is considered a long reliever or spot starter.

    Relief pitchers are NOT allowed to pitch in 4 out of 5 games in a row.

    If a pitcher throws 40 plus pitches in an inning they are done for the day. This goes for starters or relievers because of the stress involved in that inning.

    “All League franchises are committed to protecting these players and create an atmosphere and culture to help them reach their ultimate baseball goals,” added Prospect League President, Bruce Rosselli.
    Chad Dare, Sports Editor, Danville Commercial-News
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  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cj5050 View Post
    You can coach my kid. Kudos.
    I am sure there are plenty of people that may disagree on that decision to do what I did, but to me a kid's shoulder, elbow, etc are far more important to have healthy from the age of 18-75 (however long they live) than from 5/6-18.

  3. #33

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    I have seen several arm abuse cases in the post season. This year, I saw a kid throw 110-120 on Wednesday and then come back and throw 90+ on Saturday. About 8 years ago, I saw a coach throw a kid 90 on Monday and then come back and throw 184 on Thursday. In a Sectional final, I saw a kid throw 160+ through 10 1/3 and then cramp up so bad that they had to cart him off the field (same kid had an arm injury the next year in college). In first 2 of these cases I think coach was just ignorant of the dangers and in the last case I think coach just got caught up in emotions of a great ball game.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liebebball12 View Post
    Being your child you obviously may do as you please, I know I certainly would never throw my own child or yours even remotely close to that no matter how stressful the pitches were. My only question would be, was winning the game really that important?
    I coached a 14U travel team that was very average. We played the best team in the Champaign area against a kid that went on to pitch D1 in Texas one evening.
    We threw our #4 pitcher who was very average. We were up 2-1 going bottom of 6 and our pitcher had thrown 63 pitches. He did well, gave up a walk and left runners stranded at 1st and 3rd to end the 6th. He had thrown 81 pitches at the end of 6. During the inning I told our other coach to get his son up throwing, he told me our current pitcher has a no hitter still in tact. To begin the 7th inning I took out our starter and put in his son. We committed 2 errors, walked 1 and lost on a walk off single 3-2.
    The kid who had the no hitter in tact had a very angry mother who called me every 4, 6, and 7 letter awful name you can possibly think of after the game. I very calmly told her I care about the health of her child and would have done the same if it were anyone else's child. A no hitter in a travel league game between 14 yr old kids to me is not something I would ever give a 2nd thought to 5 min after it happened even if it was my own child.
    The pitcher that had this no hitter thru 6 never played an inning of high school baseball. I would make the same decision over 100 more times.
    No offense, but I am glad you never coached my kid. I don't know what more I can tell you other than every kid is different. If you coach every kid the same, then I feel you are missing something My son threw the ball 80 miles an hour with a 68 mph straight change. No curve. You can pat yourself on the back all day about taking a kid out of a game, but let me ask you something. Did you ever have your kids that pitched a game play a position later that day or the next day? My son only pitched. Didn't go out to short, didn't play outfield. 13 innings at 11 pitches an inning was easy for him. Then he sat for five days.

    More kids hurt their arms throwing from deep short or from center field. Pitchers that don't throw curve balls seldom hurt their arms on the mound, especially when they don't play a position.

    Thanks for judging though. And to act like winning the game was so important is very downgrading. I kept him pitching because he wasn't stressed at all. Not to win. Pretty crappy of you to insinuate that. A good coach wouldn't insinuate that of other coaches.
    Allright dad nabbittt, Who's on first!

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by kjryno23 View Post
    No offense, but I am glad you never coached my kid. I don't know what more I can tell you other than every kid is different. If you coach every kid the same, then I feel you are missing something My son threw the ball 80 miles an hour with a 68 mph straight change. No curve. You can pat yourself on the back all day about taking a kid out of a game, but let me ask you something. Did you ever have your kids that pitched a game play a position later that day or the next day? My son only pitched. Didn't go out to short, didn't play outfield. 13 innings at 11 pitches an inning was easy for him. Then he sat for five days.

    More kids hurt their arms throwing from deep short or from center field. Pitchers that don't throw curve balls seldom hurt their arms on the mound, especially when they don't play a position.

    Thanks for judging though. And to act like winning the game was so important is very downgrading. I kept him pitching because he wasn't stressed at all. Not to win. Pretty crappy of you to insinuate that. A good coach wouldn't insinuate that of other coaches.
    I don't think I judged anything, just simply gave my perspective. I really don't care whether you want me to your kid or not and am not the least bit upset you don't. I simply asked was the game really important to win? Obviously you said it was a wooden bat game, so I am thinking a fall ball game that means nothing. It wasn't a question to criticize or belittle, it was a real question. I seem to think if MLB pitchers rarely go 100 it makes me wonder a bit why 16 yr olds or younger would be allowed to do so. I know they are not necessarily throwing all fastball / change ups but that's just the way I see it.

    We have a different perspective on the issue obviously, you obviously think yours is the right one and that's great, it's your opinion. Not patting my back at all, I don't claim to be any genius just gave my opinion, like you did.

    Sorry that you felt I was insulting you, we just definitely don't see this the same way. I am probably much more sensitive than to this because of the number of Jr high coaches I have seen let their pitchers go 130+ over the past years just to walk in the winning run of a meaningless game. I apologize.

  6. #36
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    I agree that playing SS "on their day off" is foolhardy. I also feel that youth coaches that fall back on the "kid felt fine" argument, when the kid goes 130+, are just as foolhardy.
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  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swamp Donkey View Post
    I have seen several arm abuse cases in the post season. This year, I saw a kid throw 110-120 on Wednesday and then come back and throw 90+ on Saturday. About 8 years ago, I saw a coach throw a kid 90 on Monday and then come back and throw 184 on Thursday. In a Sectional final, I saw a kid throw 160+ through 10 1/3 and then cramp up so bad that they had to cart him off the field (same kid had an arm injury the next year in college). In first 2 of these cases I think coach was just ignorant of the dangers and in the last case I think coach just got caught up in emotions of a great ball game.
    If you are referring to the T-town/BCC sectional game in '10,i can assure for a fact the pitcher did not have an arm injury his first year in college.He did have a minor scope of his elbow following his soph season in college.

    The game you are talking about had NOTHING to do with his injury.It was a fantastic performance against BCC,he cramped up because of 90+ temperatures and his reluctance to drink adequate fluids.

  8. #38
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    I can certainly be mistaken about this: but I don't think IESA charts the number of pitches-only innings with limits for the day and a week. Should be in the baseball by-laws.

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    http://sports.yahoo.com/news/how-a-1...212918744.html

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  10. #40

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    Anybody notice that there were 2 pitchers in state tourney that went over 120 pitches? Wonder if the proposed rules were in place if that would have made a difference in outcome?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChinMusic View Post
    I agree that playing SS "on their day off" is foolhardy. I also feel that youth coaches that fall back on the "kid felt fine" argument, when the kid goes 130+, are just as foolhardy.
    I think one thing I cannot stand is, "Well I asked the player and he was good to go." These kids want to play and help the team win as best as possible. They are competitors. Or, they don't want to risk sitting the bench.

    At that point, it's on the coach to look out for the best interest in the player! Sure, I want kids to have mental and physical toughness. But, when talking about arms it becomes a bit of a different story.

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    http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports...714-story.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swamp Donkey View Post
    Anybody notice that there were 2 pitchers in state tourney that went over 120 pitches? Wonder if the proposed rules were in place if that would have made a difference in outcome?
    What team? Murphy never let a kid throw over 100. Still alot of pitches though. I remember a few years back listening on the radio and a kid threw 160ish pitches in a 10 inning game, then caught the very next day against us. That my friend is insane. Kids are always willing to step up, it takes a coach to tell them you've done your job thank you. Let's give the ball to so and so

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    The way I read into this there will be mandatory days of rest depending on pitches thrown? Something similar to what little league uses?

    How then do they monitor side bullpen sessions in practice?

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